Keener on Miracles

Yet our current understanding of “ordinary” does not comprehensively describe reality, and before we dismiss all possibility of suprahuman intervention, we are obligated to make explicit and evaluate the presupposition on which such a wholesale dismissal would be based. If we take into account the historically conditioned presuppositions favored in antiquity, we must also consider those of modern academia. These, too, constitute a legitimate context of the discussion, and will be taken into account by subsequent interpreters of current scholarship if (as we may presume likely) the worldview of our era proves as transient as those of its predecessors have. We cannot evade being explicit concerning presuppositions informing much traditional modern historiography if we are to hear the ancient narratives sympathetically, and much less can we do so if we are to honestly examine the possibility that any ancient miracle claims could reflect genuinely suprahuman causation.

Craid S. Keener, Miracles Vol. 1, 102.

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About mjbutterworth

I love drinking/making coffee, making/listening to music, riding bicycles, and reading about theology. I also like blogs that talk about those things. Most of all, I love Jesus because his gospel has changed my life.
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2 Responses to Keener on Miracles

  1. Rowan Paterson says:

    Its looks quite a read (read BIG). Worth the investment?

  2. It’s definitely a massive book, it’s also very scholarly. On the bright side there’s so many footnotes it doesn’t take long to read a page!

    I am enjoying it, but it’s for a class and I doubt I would have picked it up on my own initiative. I do think it would be a great book to consult if you’re teaching on a gospel or if you’re discipling someone with a lot of doubts.

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